Reversing 'make install' ?

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Reversing 'make install' ?

JSoet
I had a typo in my command and so I accidentally did a normal 'make install' when I meant to do an install to a specific directory by specifying DESTDIR=/path/to/dir...

It doesn't seem that there's a 'make uninstall' included, is there another command I'm missing that can do the uninstall?

Thanks,
Jordan
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Re: Reversing 'make install' ?

Benjamin Kaduk-2
On Mon, 25 Jul 2016, JSoet wrote:

> I had a typo in my command and so I accidentally did a normal 'make install'
> when I meant to do an install to a specific directory by specifying
> DESTDIR=/path/to/dir...
>
> It doesn't seem that there's a 'make uninstall' included, is there another
> command I'm missing that can do the uninstall?

There is no easy way to do so.  Any files that already existed in those
paths have been overwritten and cannot be recovered other than via system
backups.

Some approximations would be to look for files modified at the same time
as the installed files, or to look at those files that were installed into
the DESTDIR and locate the analogous paths in the non-DESTDIR system.

-Ben Kaduk
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Re: Reversing 'make install' ?

Robbie Harwood
In reply to this post by JSoet
JSoet <[hidden email]> writes:

> I had a typo in my command and so I accidentally did a normal 'make
> install' when I meant to do an install to a specific directory by
> specifying DESTDIR=/path/to/dir...
>
> It doesn't seem that there's a 'make uninstall' included, is there another
> command I'm missing that can do the uninstall?

One thing you could try is making a directory (e.g., somewhere in /tmp)
and setting it as your install prefix.  Then install there and see what
files get created; delete anything in the corresponding /path/to/dir you
accidentally installed.

You'd need to be careful, though - some files will have been
overwritten, rather than created.  At the very least you will need to
reinstall your system kerberos packages (if using a package manager).

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